Faith in Perspective

Last week I ended with a thought-provoking quote from Augustine —

“To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.”

Far be it from me to argue with one of the great minds of the church, but I wonder again if Augustine was correct. Faith is subjective in so many ways. Faith is sometimes described as distinct from reason or even its opposite.

Faith must have some objective component! If someone disappoints me again and again, I reach a place where I no longer have faith in him or her. If the evidence accumulates that my assumption is untrue or my perspective is flawed I need to question or abandon it.

Faith is a tension between  believing in spite of the evidence (to which I plan to turn next week) and the need to root my faith in a reality that is, well, real.

Much of what I believe I cannot prove. I cannot prove that God is real. That I love my wife and children, family and friends. That America is an ideal worth believing.  And as I suggested a week ago I have plenty of reasons to not believe, to not trust.

But when I consider the alternative I am left adrift. I cannot conceive a world without faith (which to me also implies a world without hope and without love). Or life without these things.  I want my explanations! I want my reasons! I want to know “why?” But what I want even more is to believe.

Categories: Faith Journey | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Faith in Perspective

  1. VickiH

    The only way to objectively examine faith is by assessing its action, its results, what happens in its absence. If Emily Dickinson said, “That love is all there is, is all we know of love,” I would go a step further and say, that for me, God is all there is. Someone very wise helped me to learn that this reality would be all I get to know about God in this lifetime. God may on rare occasion send slivers and glimmers at which I may marvel and for those I am eternally grateful.

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